Bathroom Sink Drain

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Bathroom Sink Drain

Choose the Right Style Make sure your home’s bathroom presents a stylish appearance by choosing a drain that complements the sink. This doesn’t mean the drain needs to match the sink and faucet. In fact, a drain with a different material or finish often works well as an accent to the sink. Brass drains are some of the most popular bathroom sink drains, as the material is both pleasing to the eye and durable. Stainless steel and bronze drains are also common.Bronze is a versatile finish that creates an eye-catching combination with several sink materials. It blends well with copper sinks, and stands out when paired with concrete sinks. A nickel finish offers a nice shine; you just have to keep it clean so it retains its appearance. If you’re going for a modern look, a chrome drain is a great choice, particularly with a matching chrome faucet. Shop Brass Sink Drains & Strainers
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Bathroom Sink Drain

Measure the Sink The sink drain needs to fit your bathroom sink’s drain opening to work properly. Measure that opening to ensure you get the right size drain, or check the manufacturer’s instructions that came with the sink, as they should include the corresponding drain size. Most drain openings are 1 1/4 inches, although 1 1/2 inches and 1 5/8 inches are also common sizes. Shop Sinks
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Bathroom Sink Drain

Overflows An overflow is an optional feature found in some bathroom sinks. As the name suggests, it helps prevent the sink from overflowing. An overflow is a small opening in the sink, and it works by letting air flow into the drain while the sink is full of water so the sink drains water more quickly. Bathroom sink drains are available with and without overflows; check whether your sink has an overflow so you can choose the right type of drain. Shop Sink Accessories
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Bathroom Sink Drain

The sink drain needs to fit your bathroom sink’s drain opening to work properly. Measure that opening to ensure you get the right size drain, or check the manufacturer’s instructions that came with the sink, as they should include the corresponding drain size. Most drain openings are 1 1/4 inches, although 1 1/2 inches and 1 5/8 inches are also common sizes.
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Bathroom Sink Drain

An overflow is an optional feature found in some bathroom sinks. As the name suggests, it helps prevent the sink from overflowing. An overflow is a small opening in the sink, and it works by letting air flow into the drain while the sink is full of water so the sink drains water more quickly. Bathroom sink drains are available with and without overflows; check whether your sink has an overflow so you can choose the right type of drain.
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Bathroom Sink Drain

JULY 11, 2016 by Andrew Schneider Bathroom Specialist For those bathroom sinks that don’t come with a drain, finding one on your own is often the final step in a bathroom remodel. While there are a variety of bathroom sink drain options available, the right one should mesh with the style of your bathroom, giving it the perfect finishing touch. Follow a few simple guidelines to ensure you find the right drain.
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For those bathroom sinks that don’t come with a drain, finding one on your own is often the final step in a bathroom remodel. While there are a variety of bathroom sink drain options available, the right one should mesh with the style of your bathroom, giving it the perfect finishing touch. Follow a few simple guidelines to ensure you find the right drain.
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Support the Sink If you have a vessel sink positioned above the countertop, as opposed to a recessed sink that is partially inside the cabinet, choose a drain with a mounting ring. The mounting ring supports the sink, which is important, since the sink isn’t being supported all the way around by a cabinet. Shop Best Reviewed Drains & Strainers
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By the time you install a vanity cabinet and drop the sink into it, the rough-in plumbing for the drain should be done. If it is, you’ll see a 2-inch plastic pipe stubbing out of the wall under the sink. To finish plumbing the sink drain, you have to connect it to that pipe via a P-trap. The job is easier than doing the rough-in plumbing that produced the stub-out, but it still calls for care. If your measurements are off or you don’t tighten connections properly, the pipes will leak.
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Pop-Up or Grid Bathroom sink drains are either pop-up drains or grid drains, with the difference being pop-up drains can close, allowing water to build up in the sink. Grid drains have small holes that can’t close, so water always drains. Pop-up drains usually open and close through a lever that’s behind the sink faucet, although some drains have levers in other locations. These types of drains are good if you ever need to fill the sink with water. However, the advantage of grid drains is the small holes only allow water to get through while the grid catches anything larger, which helps prevent clogs. Shop Sink Drains & Strainers
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Open the drain assembly packaging and examine the contents. You should see a threaded strainer with a gasket and nut, and a tailpiece — a short length of pipe that extends down from the drain under the sink. If the drain includes a pop-up stopper, there will also be a stopper lever that screws into a hole in the tailpiece.
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1Open the drain assembly packaging and examine the contents. You should see a threaded strainer with a gasket and nut, and a tailpiece — a short length of pipe that extends down from the drain under the sink. If the drain includes a pop-up stopper, there will also be a stopper lever that screws into a hole in the tailpiece.

If you have a vessel sink positioned above the countertop, as opposed to a recessed sink that is partially inside the cabinet, choose a drain with a mounting ring. The mounting ring supports the sink, which is important, since the sink isn’t being supported all the way around by a cabinet.
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Hey Bob, Have you ever heard of the pipe being too long or the sink being too thin to make a good connection? After popping the drain in and screwing the brass lock nut on as far as it will go, there’s still a huge gap between it and the sink. I did put the rubber washer and the white washer on before the brass nut. The two holes in the pipe are below the sink level. Are there different sizes??? Thanks for your help.
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Christine James February 24, 2017 at 12:48 pm # Hey Bob, Have you ever heard of the pipe being too long or the sink being too thin to make a good connection? After popping the drain in and screwing the brass lock nut on as far as it will go, there’s still a huge gap between it and the sink. I did put the rubber washer and the white washer on before the brass nut. The two holes in the pipe are below the sink level. Are there different sizes??? Thanks for your help. Reply
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Hey Bob, Have you ever heard of the pipe being too long or the sink being too thin to make a good connection? After popping the drain in and screwing the brass lock nut on as far as it will go, there’s still a huge gap between it and the sink. I did put the rubber washer and the white washer on before the brass nut. The two holes in the pipe are below the sink level. Are there different sizes??? Thanks for your help. Reply
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Bob Jackson February 24, 2017 at 3:31 pm # That shouldn’t be a problem if the replacement drain body is fully threaded. Did you install the drain first followed by the flange? If the sink is very thin the worst that should happen is the flange can’t be screwed in all the way because it bottoms out on the rubber washer. You can e-mail pictures to bobhandymanhowto.com, replace the with the @ character. Reply
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To get at the clog, try lifting out the stopper (Photo 1). Sometimes it’ll come right out. If it doesn’t lift out, it’s held in by the pivot rod. Release the stopper by removing the pivot rod nut and pulling out the pivot rod (Photo 3). If you can’t loosen the nut by hand, use pliers. With the pivot rod pulled out, you’ll be able to lift out the stopper. Then to get the clog out, bend a wire in a tight hook (a light-duty clothes hanger or short length of electrical wire will do) and fish out the hair (Photo 2). If you didn’t have to remove the pivot rod to remove the stopper, you can just drop the stopper back down into the drain. If you removed the pivot rod, first drop the stopper into the drain. Then line up the pivot rod with the slot in the stopper and reinsert it. Finally, hand-tighten the pivot rod nut.
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Bathroom sink drains are either pop-up drains or grid drains, with the difference being pop-up drains can close, allowing water to build up in the sink. Grid drains have small holes that can’t close, so water always drains.


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