Gardening Tips

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Gardening Tips

Whether you are hoping for a big harvest, a beautiful landscape, or a little stress relief, knowing the when and how of gardening will help you be a success. Use these timely garden tips to eliminate some of the guesswork. For more gardening tips, check out Melinda’s gardening books.
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Gardening Tips

The pot-in-a-pot method is one which you can use to solve a whole lot of gardening problems.  This page over on Florida Friendly Plants lists 20 different reasons to consider it.  It’s excellent for flexible gardening (you can move things around with ease, without upsetting the plants nearly as much—great if you are experimenting with light conditions and such), and perfect if you have sand, coral rock, or encroaching roots in your garden.  Those are just a few reasons to try it.  Check out the page linked above to get started, and then have a look at this updated post, which will teach you even more about the pot-in-a-pot method.  This really is one of the simplest and most ingenious gardening ideas I think I’ve ever seen!
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Gardening Tips

Clear plastic bins are awesome for just about everything.  As it turns out, one of their many applications is in gardening.  These bins can serve beautifully as mini-greenhouses for growing seedlings!  Since they are cheap and versatile, and can have other applications off-season, this is one of the best gardening tips and tricks for beginners.
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Gardening Tips

Use Space EfficientlyIt’s a rare gardener who has as much fertile growing space as he or she would like, and most of us work limited-space gardens as intensively as we can. (Keep reading for tips on how to “Make the Most of Small or Shady Gardens.”) In gardens of any size, try the following tips to make prime use of every bed and row. 11. Plant in Blocks. According to Colorado State University Extension research, you can quadruple per-square-foot production of small kitchen vegetables such as lettuce, carrots and beets by planting them in blocks within wide beds rather than in rows. Block planting makes efficient use of space by keeping the spacing between plants tight and eliminating unnecessary pathways. 12. Try Vertical Gardening. When he moved from suburban Baltimore to a ground-floor condo in Albuquerque, N.M., lifelong organic gardener Ary Bruno went vertical to make the most of his limited space. By adding 3 to 4 inches of compost to his compact beds each spring, Bruno can grow trellised tomatoes, pole beans and cucumbers in his patio garden in summer, followed by greens in fall. Vertical growing can greatly increase your garden returns. 13. Interplant Compatible Crops. “When growing a summer crop such as tomatoes, I plant lettuce and spinach to grow in the shade of the taller plants,” says Bonnie White of Albany, Ore. “I also like growing a crop that takes a while, such as carrots, alongside a faster-growing crop such as radishes, which will be ready in only 30 days.” Find many more ideas for complementary crops in Companion Planting With Vegetables and Flowers. 14. Succession Sow for Steady Harvests. With lettuce, snap peas, sweet corn and other vegetables that mature like clockwork, make two sowings three weeks apart to lengthen your harvest season. Or, plant two varieties with different maturation times on the same day. 15. Use Seedlings to Run Tight Successions. Let’s say it’s June, and you want to replace bolting lettuce with summer squash. If you had thought ahead and started squash seeds in containers, you could pull out the lettuce, add some compost and plug in the squash, all in the same afternoon. Using seedlings tightens up the timing of succession planting (sometimes called “relay planting”), whether you’re replacing spring spinach with fall broccoli or following cucumbers with fall snow peas sprouted indoors. 16. Plant One New Edible Every Week. Eating squash every day can get old, but you won’t have that problem if your garden offers up small bites of unusual veggies, such as bok choy, bulb fennel, celeriac, escaroles, radicchio and white beets. I like to devote one wide row to “this-and-that” crops that I sow in small pinches. Organizing the garden this way keeps these crops from getting lost and gives me a place to try unfamiliar veggies.
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Whether you like to get your hands dirty in the garden or not, it’s nice to have a few gardening tips and ideas up your sleeve. Here are some of my favorite tips and tricks for your yard that I hadn’t heard of before. I thought they were all pretty clever, but then again, I’m still a rookie at this soil and seed stuff!
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This is my first year having a true garden, and so far I’m loving the time I get outside playing in the dirt and absorbing the sunshine. It’s certainly a nice break from my computer! As a beginner, I’m learning a lot of things that will make next year’s garden easier, and hopefully a little healthier, too. I don’t want to win the prize for the largest squash (not there yet), but I do want a enough juicy tomatoes to last all summer long. Whether you like to get your hands dirty in the garden or not, it’s nice to have a few gardening tips and ideas up your sleeve. Here are some of my favorite tips and tricks for your yard that I hadn’t heard of before. I thought they were all pretty clever, but then again, I’m still a rookie at this soil and seed stuff!
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Here, the latest tips and tricks from Paul James, host of Gardening by the Yard:1. To remove the salt deposits that form on clay pots, combine equal parts white vinegar, rubbing alcohol and water in a spray bottle. Apply the mixture to the pot and scrub with a plastic brush. Let the pot dry before you plant anything in it.
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It’s a rare gardener who has as much fertile growing space as he or she would like, and most of us work limited-space gardens as intensively as we can. (Keep reading for tips on how to “Make the Most of Small or Shady Gardens.”) In gardens of any size, try the following tips to make prime use of every bed and row.

Glam up your backyard workspace by adding plenty of surfaces for cutting flowers and a sink for washing muddy hands. You can also utilize the walls to hang brooms, rakes, or other gardening tools.
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Glam up your backyard workspace by adding plenty of surfaces for cutting flowers and a sink for washing muddy hands. You can also utilize the walls to hang brooms, rakes, or other gardening tools.PLUS: 14 Ways to Perk Up Your Garden Shed
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Wondering what’s wrong with your plant? Or maybe you need some planting suggestions for shady, dry or difficult landscape sites. And how about strategies for bringing birds and butterflies into your garden. Find answers to your gardening questions, plant information in the A-Z plant lists and a Plant Guide to help you select just the right plant for your landscape.
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To get a thorough reading of your soil’s pH and nutrient levels, send a sample to your local nursery or cooperative extension, suggests garden expert Christy Dailey of christy gardens. (There are also at-home testing kits available at Lowes, Home Depot, or any gardening store.) The results will tell you how acidic or alkaline your soil is, which affects how plants absorb nutrients. Since different plants thrive best in different pH levels, this test will help you decide what to plant or indicate how you should treat the soil.
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“Growing vegetables is a fun introduction to gardening,” says Sullivan. They don’t take as long to grow, so if you make a mistake you won’t have wasted months and months of your time. Sunflowers are also a good option, since they grow quickly and tall, or try easy-to-grow ferns—both of these can be grown all across the United States. “Early success is inspiring,” he says. “It might make you want to move on to more complicated plants.”
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…or have a general idea of your big gardening tasks each season. “In the spring, I start fertilizing all plants and do that every six-to-eight weeks throughout the growing season, which usually ends in the fall,” says Gutierrez. “It’s usually too hot to plant in the summer. In the fall, after the heavy heat has passed, I prune trees and large shrubs. If I want to add bulbs or any new plants for the next year, I add them at this time, but you can also plant in early spring. And winter is when I cut back woody plants and roses, usually before the first frost.”
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“Gardening is a process,” says Sullivan. “It doesn’t just happen in one day—it takes time.” Sometimes impatience will cause you to overwater or fuss too much with the plants in the hopes that they will grow faster. Monitor them regularly, but unless something looks wrong, let them be.

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